The China Factor in the U.S. Presidential Election | Duke Kunshan University

The China Factor in the U.S. Presidential Election

E.g., 12/05/2020
E.g., 12/05/2020
10/15
20:30 to 22:30
Online

With the United States heading to the polls in November, Duke Kunshan’s Center for the Study of Contemporary China will host a special online event on Oct. 15 to look at what the outcome of this presidential election could mean for U.S. policies and perceptions toward China.

Start time: 8:30pm (China time) / 8:30am (EST)

Register to attend: https://duke.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlfuChrT0tEtV6XKUczRZ4ZzamzY0gnxpy

Agenda
(All times BST)

8:30pm
Welcome and Introduction Speakers
Melanie Manion, Vor Broker Family Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Duke University, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China, Duke Kunshan University

8:40pm
“An Introduction to the U.S. Presidential Elections”
Kelvin Ma, managing partner, PKF Demei Law Firm and PKF Asia-Pacific

8:55pm
“American Attitudes towards China under the Trump Presidency”
Diana C. Mutz, Samuel A. Stouffer Professor of Political Science and Communication, University of Pennsylvania

9:10pm
“The Three Elections of Four Political Parties in 2020, and How They Might Shape American Policy toward China”
John Aldrich, Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science, Duke University

9:25pm
“Sino-U.S. Economic Relations, Great Power Competition, and the Election”
David A. Lake, Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego

9:40pm
Speaker Q&A with Zoom audience

10:15
Wrap-up and thank you to speakers and audience

Speakers

Kelvin Ma is managing partner of PKF Legal Demei Law Firm, board director of PKF Asia-Pacific, and chairman of the international membership subcommittee of the Association to Invest In the USA. He has graduate degrees from the University of Southern California and University of Texas, Austin, and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is licensed to practice law in China and the U.S. states of New York and Wisconsin. He is an expert in global business migration, with extensive experience in cross-border investment, wealth management, and inheritance planning. He has provided legal advice to more than 3,000 high-net-worth individuals and delivered more than 800 speeches at major summits and conferences. He has shared the stage with politicians from around the world, including former U.S. ambassadors to China Gary Locke and Jon Huntsman. His explanations of the American political system are appreciated by a wide audience in China.

Diana C. Mutz is the Samuel A. Stouffer Professor of Political Science and Communication and director of the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert on U.S. politics, she has published widely on political psychology and political communication. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a recipient of the Lifetime Career Achievement Award in Political Communication from the American Political Science Association, and Guggenheim and Carnegie fellowships. Her publications include prizewinning books “Impersonal Influence: How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes,” “Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative Versus Participatory Democracy,” and “In-Your-Face Politics: The Consequences of Uncivil Media.” Her forthcoming book, “Winners and Losers: American Attitudes Toward Foreign Trade,” will be published by Princeton University Press in 2021.

David A. Lake is the Gerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. He is an expert on international politics, who has published widely on international political economy and international relations theory. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the founding chair of the International Political Economy Society. He has served as president of both the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association. His publications include “Hierarchy in International Relations Power,” “Entangling Relations: American Foreign Policy in its Century,” and “Protection, and Free Trade: International Sources of U.S. Commercial Strategy, 1887-1939.” He is currently writing “Indirect Rule: The Making of U.S. International Hierarchy.”

John H. Aldrich is the Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science at Duke University. He is an expert on American political institutions and political behavior who has published widely on political parties, electoral politics and methodology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and served as president of the American Political Science Association, Southern Political Science Association, and Midwest Political Science Association. His books include “Why Parties?: The Origin and Transformation of Political Parties in America,” “Why Parties Matter,” “Before the Convention: Strategies and Choices in Presidential Nomination Campaigns,” and a series on elections, the most recent of which is “Change and Continuity in the 2016 and 2018 Elections.” The American Political Science Association has honored Aldrich for a career of distinguished service to the profession and association.