Freedom’s Proximity: The Interconnections between American Slavery, British Colonial Abolition, and Slave Ship Revolt | Duke Kunshan University

Freedom’s Proximity: The Interconnections between American Slavery, British Colonial Abolition, and Slave Ship Revolt

E.g., 12/05/2020
E.g., 12/05/2020
10/13
21:15 to 22:30
Online

Zoom ID: 261 330 4845

Freedom Lab presents “Freedom’s Proximity: The Interconnections between American Slavery, British Colonial Abolition, and Slave Ship Revolt” – a talk by Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie, professor at Howard University.

With opening welcome from Scott Maceachern, vice chancellor for academic affairs, DKU.

Abstract
In November 1841, 19 rebels seized the U.S. slave ship Creole transporting 139 slaves from Virginia to Louisiana and steered it to the British Bahamas. After a disputatious week between U.S. officials and British colonial authorities, the slaves walked to freedom and scattered through the region. Drawing upon new historical documents, this talk narrates this fascinating story. It further situates this tale within the context of an expanding empire of American slavery and an expanding empire of British colonial abolition during the mid-nineteenth century.

Speaker
Born in London, United Kingdom, Jeffrey Kerr-Ritchie earned his first history degree at Kingston University. He completed his doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania and went on to teach at Wesleyan, Columbia, Penn, SUNY-Binghamton, and UNC-Greensboro. He has been teaching the African Diaspora field at Howard University since 2006 and served as graduate studies since 2015.

His research interests include slavery, abolition and post-emancipation societies, especially in North America and the Caribbean during the 19th century. He has spoken on these topics in numerous countries, including Cuba, the Netherlands, Egypt and Vietnam. Alongside numerous articles, he is author of the books “Freed People in the Tobacco South” (2003), “Rites of August First: Emancipation Day in the Black Atlantic World” (2011), “Freedom Seekers: Essays in Comparative Emancipation” (2014), and most recently “Rebellious Passage: The Creole Revolt and America’s Coastal Slave Trade” (2019).

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