2nd Water-Energy in China Workshop

Duke University and Duke Kunshan University

2nd Water-Energy in China Workshop

October 14-15, 2015
Duke Kunshan University

Kunshan, China

Co-Chairs

Prof. Avner Vengosh
Duke University and Duke Kunshan University

Prof. Marc Deshusses
Duke University and Duke Kunshan University

Prof. Erika Weinthal
Duke University


Background

The rapid growth of unconventional energy exploration – that is, shale gas and tight sand oil – has the potential to transform water and energy economies globally. For China, the onset of unconventional shale gas exploration has the potential to alter China’s dependence on coal and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, unconventional shale gas exploration brings with it an array of environmental and regulatory challenges. In particular, unconventional energy exploration requires large amounts of water resources and generates high volumes of waste.  The “Water-Energy Nexus in China” will highlight the scientific, environmental, engineering, and regulatory effects of linking water and energy. For China, the intricate relationship between water and energy will directly influence China’s economic trajectory over the next few decades.

Numerous scientific studies have shown that China’s current and future water demands are not balanced with its water availability; to remedy this imbalance, China has initiated a massive water transport project to divert water from the south to the arid north. Compounding China’s water shortages, the quality of water resources in China has been rapidly deteriorating, causing an additional (and typically unaccounted for) water deficit.  Energy production in China relies heavily on coal, and despite efforts to reduce atmospheric emissions, coal combustion for electricity and industry production is still a major source of air pollution, posing major health risks to a large fraction of China population. Coal is also water-intensive, requiring large amounts of water for both its production and combustion.

Alternative energy sources for coal are unconventional oil and gas from shale gas and coalbed methane through the application of hydraulic fracturing. Since 2005, the United States has tripled its gas production and has become the leading country in petroleum and shale gas production owing to the use of hydraulic fracturing. Yet the rapid rise of unconventional energy exploration in the United States has triggered public concerns about the environmental and human health implications of this technology. One of the most debated issues concerns water contamination from leaking shale gas wells and inadequate management of the wastewater that is generated together with the oil and gas.


Objectives

The water-energy nexus workshop at Duke Kunshan University (DKU) will examine the scientific and policy implications of water and energy being so tightly linked. The absence of water and especially clean water can infringe upon a country’s energy security – that is, the ability to provide sufficient supplies of energy. Moreover, remediation of contaminated water (e.g., by reverse osmosis desalination) requires more energy and thus the development of innovative technologies for sustainable and economic treatment of contaminated water are urgently needed. The transition from coal to unconventional energy production such as hydraulic fracturing could furthermore result in additional sources of water contamination that could accelerate the depletion of water resources in China. In the United States about 80% of the oil and gas wastewater is subjected to deep injection to dispose of the highly toxic and saline water. Yet the massive injection of oil and gas wastewater has resulted in increased frequency of earthquakes in many areas. In China, particularly in the Sichuan Basin, wastewater injection would pose high risks for seismic catastrophes. As such, one of the major challenges for developing the shale gas and using hydraulic fracturing in China is the management and treatment of the oil and gas wastewater so as to take into concern the array of environmental and health externalities. China is at the initial stage of considering how to transition away from coal to unconventional energy resources. This workshop builds upon an earlier workshop at DKU on the water-energy nexus in November 2014 that presented the main challenges facing China as it begins to develop its unconventional energy resources. This workshop aims to generate lessons learned and recommendations for moving forward, based upon learning from other international experiences. In doing so, the workshop will present research and lessons learned for devising environmentally sensitive and appropriate tools and policies for mitigating the environmental effects of shale gas development and water utilization.


Program

The DKU Water Energy Workshop will take place on October 14-15, 2015. It  will cover three aspects of the water-energy nexus:

  • First, the workshop will survey the risks of oil and gas wastewater for water quality based on the US experience.
  • Second, the workshop will present novel technologies for water treatment that could address the acute water quality issues in China, including the treatment of highly saline oil and gas wastewater. Topics will also include potential investment opportunities in novel technologies for water treatment.
  • Third, the workshop will address the legal and regulatory policies that are needed to manage the water-energy nexus in order to provide a safe transition from coal to unconventional energy development in China. In particular, attention will be paid to the importance of linking water and energy regulations and policies.

The workshop will promote an intensive exchange of ideas, enhance collaboration, and pave the way for future research projects between the participants, Duke and DKU faculty and leading Chinese academic, government, and industry institutions.

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015
Time
Event
Location
08:30 – 09:00
Registration
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
09:00 – 09:30
Welcome
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
09:30 – 10:00
Prof. Jiane Zuo
Tsinghua University School of Environment
10:30 – 10:50
Coffee Break
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
10:50 – 11:20
Prof. Chao Zhang
School of Economics and Management, Tongji University
11:20 – 11:50
Prof. Yongchun Zhao
State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan
11:50 – 12:00
Discussion
12:00 – 13:20
Lunch
1/F Executive Dining, Academic Building
13:20 – 13:50
Dr. Qinhong Hu
University of Geosciences, Wuhan
University of Texas at Arlington USA
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
13:50 – 14:20
Dr. Yunyan Ni
PetroChina Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Beijing
Geochemical comparison of the natural gases from the largest tight gas field (Sulige) and the largest shale gas field (Fuling) in China
14:20 – 14:50
Prof. Marc Deshusses
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, USA
14:50 – 15:20
Dr. Sujie Qin
Department of Environmental Science, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University
Impact of urbanization process on surface water quality related to pesticides in China
15:20 – 15:30
Discussion
15:30 – 16:00
Coffee Break
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
16:00 – 16:30
16:30 – 17:00
Dr. Lei Tian
Energy Research Institute, Beijing, China
17:00 – 17:30
Prof. Erika Weinthal
Duke University
17:30 – 17:50
Discussion
17:50 – 18:20
Reception
1/F Lobby, Academic Building

 

Thursday, October 15th, 2015
Time
Event
Location
08:30 – 09:00
Registration
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
09:00 – 09:30
Prof. Jun Xia
The Research Institute for Water Security, Wuhan University
Climate change impact on water resources vulnerability and adaptive water management in major river basins in China
09:30 – 10:00
Prof. Huaming Guo
School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences
10:00 – 10:30
Prof. Ori Lahav
Water Institute, Technion, Environmental, Water and Agricultural Engineering, Israel
10:30 – 10:50
Coffee Break
1/F Lobby, Academic Building
10:50 – 11:20
Prof. Tao He
Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences
11:20 – 11:50
Prof. Jinying Xi
Division of Environmental Biology, Tsinghua University School of Environment
11:50 – 12:00
Discussion
12:00 – 13:20
Lunch
1/F Executive Dining, Academic Building
13:20 – 13:50
Prof. Xiaodi Hao
The R&D Centre for Sustainable Environmental Biotechnology, Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture
13:50 – 14:20
Dr. Qingcheng He
China Geologic Survey, Beijing
14:20 – 14:50
Panel: Identification of major gaps in research, engineering and policy
Dan Guttman
NYU Shanghai and US Center, Tsinghua University
Prof. Erika Weinthal
Duke University
14:50 – 15:20
Discussion and wrap up

*These invited speakers have indicated their interest, but have not yet confirmed their participation


Preliminary List of Speakers

  • Prof. Jiane Zuo
    Tsinghua University
  • Prof. Avner Vengosh
    Duke University, USA
    Water footprint and environmental impacts of unconventional energy production and hydraulic fracturing: lessons from United States. 
  • Prof. Chao Zhang
    School of Economics and Management, Tongji University
    A detailed spatial analysis on the water stress of thermal power generation in China
  • Prof. Yongchun Zhao
    State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan
    Mercury and other contaminants emission and control during coal combustion in China
  • Dr. Qinhong Hu
    University of Geosciences, Wuhan, and University of Texas at Arlington USA, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Sustainable shale resource development implicated from environmental and production-decline concerns: learning from American experience 
  • Dr. Yunyan Ni
    PetroChina Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Beijing
    Geochemical comparison of the natural gases from the largest tight gas field (Sulige) and the largest shale gas field (Fuling) in China
  • Prof. Marc Deshusses
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, USA
    Waste treatment processes: Opportunities for energy generation or energy minimization
  • Dr. Sujie Qin
    Department of Environmental Science, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University
    Impact of urbanization process on surface water quality related to pesticides in China
  • Dr. Alvin Lin
    Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), China office
    Regulations of environmental impacts from shale gas development in China: Current status, gaps, and opportunities
  • Dr. Lei Tian
    Energy Research Institute, Beijing, China
    An overview on shale gas development in China
  • Prof. Erika Weinthal
    Duke University
    Water-energy nexus and security
  • Prof. Jun Xia
    The Research Institute for Water Security (RIWS), Wuhan University
    Climate change impact on water resources vulnerability and adaptive water management in major river basins in China
  • Prof. Huaming Guo
    School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences
    Naturally occurring contaminants (radioactivity, arsenic) in groundwater in China: impacts and implications.
  • Prof. Ori Lahav
    Water Institute, Technion, Environmental, Water and Agricultural Engineering, Israel
    Reducing the specific energy consumption of 1st-pass seawater RO by application of high-flux membranes fed with high-pH, decarbonated seawater
  • Prof. Tao He
    Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    Forward osmosis membranes for recovery of water from produced water in oil/gas industry
  • Prof. Jinying Xi
    Division of Environmental Biology, Tsinghua University School of Environment
    Reducing energy consumption for odor control at wastewater treatment plants
  • Prof. Xiaodi Hao
    The R & D Centre for Sustainable Environmental Biotechnology, Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture
    Looking beyond struvite for P-recovery
  • Dr. Qingcheng He
    China Geologic Survey, Beijing
    Wastewater injection - a case study in China
  • Dr. Dan Guttman
    NYU Shanghai and US Center, Tsinghua University
    Environmental law in China

Photos in Forum


Travel and Logistic

Workshop Venue

Duke Kunshan University
No. 8 Duke Avenue, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China 215316
Tel: +86 512 5777 9988
www.dukekunshan.edu.cn

How to get to Duke Kunshan University

Bordering Shanghai to its east and Suzhou to its west, Duke Kunshan University is well connected to major cities in China and can be easily reached by air, car and train.

By Air

Pudong Airport

Take a Taxi - 100mins, Cost USD 65

Hongqiao Airport

Two options: 

  1. Take a Taxi directly to DKU (60mins, Cost USD 50)
  2. Walk to Hongqiao Railway Station (20mins), then take a High Speed Train to Kunshan South Station (20mins, Cost USD 5). From Kunshan South Station either take Taxi to DKU (25mins, Cost USD 10) or wait for the free DKU Shuttle to DKU

By Car

From Shanghai

Highway G2 – Highway S5 Bacheng Exit – Turn left toward Bacheng – Turn left at Zuchongzhi Road, then left again at Chuan Shi Road.  At Wuhan Daxue Road, turn right. The West Entrance to DKU is on your left

From Suzhou

Highway G312 – To Bacheng Direction Exit, onto Gucheng Road. Turn right on Xiaolin Road then left onto Zuchongzhi Road.  Turn right at Chuan Shi Road and right again at Wuhan Daxue Road. The West Entrance to DKU is on your left.

By Train

From Shanghai

High Speed Train to Kunshan South Station (20mins, Cost USD 5). Then either take a taxi to DKU (25mins, Cost USD 10) or take the free DKU Shuttle to DKU (25mins)

From Beijing

High Speed Train to Kunshan South Station (5 hours 30mins, Cost USD 90) Then either take a taxi to DKU (25mins, Cost USD 10) or take the free DKU Shuttle to DKU (25mins)

Taxi Driver Introduction Card

Click here to download taxi card with our address in Chinese

DKU Map

Click here to download a DKU campus map

Accomodation

The following hotels are providing special room rates for conference attendees. A shuttle bus will run between Swissotel Kunshan, Times Hotel and Duke Kunshan University (DKU) the conference to help you get to and from your hotel. 

Swissotel Kunshan

No. 387,Qianjingzhong Road, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China 215300

Tel: +86 512 5788 5788

Email:reservations.kunshan@swissotel.com

Click here to download the reservation form

Times Hotel

No. 105, Boshi Road, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China 215300

Tel: +86 512 5703 6888

Email:sdbg2012@126.com

Click here to download the reservation form

Fairmont Yangcheng Lake  

No. 3668 West Ma'anshan Road, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China 215300

Tel: +86 512 5780 0888

Email: reservation.kun@fairmont.com

Click here to download the reservation form

SHUTTLE SCHEDULE 

A shuttle bus will depart from Kunshan South Train Station, Swissotel Kunshan, and Times Hotel to Duke Kunshan University (DKU) on October 14th & 15th help attendees to attend the workshop.

 

Kunshan South Station

Swissotel

Times Hotel

14 - Oct

08:15

08:00

08:30

15 - Oct

08:15

08:00

08:30

A shuttle bus will depart from Duke Kunshan University (DKU) to Kunshan South Train Station, Swissotel Kunshan, and Times Hotel on October 14th & 15th to help attendees to back to two hotels and Kunshan South Station 

 

Kunshan South Station

Swissotel Kunshan

Times Hotel

14 - Oct

18:30

18:30

18:30

15 - Oct

15:30

15:30

15:30

For attendees who plan to stay at the Fairmont Yangcheng Lake please contact the hotel concierge to arrange your own transportation to attend the workshop.