Mutational Signatures Reveal Widespread Exposure to Mutagenic and Nephrotoxic Aristolochic Acids in East Asia | Duke Kunshan University
Mutational Signatures Reveal Widespread Exposure to Mutagenic and Nephrotoxic Aristolochic Acids in East Asia
Speaker: 
Dr. Steve G. Rozen

Director of Duke-NUS Center for Computational Biology, Professor of Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Program

Sep 03rd 2018 12:00 to 13:00
Room 1079, Academic Building
Thursday, August 30, 2018 - 10:00

Summary of talk:  

Aristolochic acids and their analogues (collectively, AAAs) are a family of chemicals that are known to cause urinary tract cancers (especially cancers of the ureter and bladder) and kidney failure.  Until recently, AAA exposure was thought to be confined to a few geographical hotspots, mainly Taiwan and parts of the Balkans in Europe, where AAA exposure causes Balkan endemic nephropathy. However, the AAA mutational signature now shows that AAA exposure is prevalent and geographically widespread in East Asia and impacts multiple types of cancer.

Brief Biography:

Steve Rozen's research has spanned bioinformatics, human genetics and cancer genomics. Rozen founded and directs the Duke-NUS Centre for Computational Biology, which has published > 250 scientific papers since 2013.  Rozen's own laboratory focuses on bioinformatics and cancer genomics, and is part of a team-science effort in cancer genomics that led to multiple papers, including 5 in Nature Genetics. This research was recognized by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2018 Team Science Award and the 2015 Singapore President's Science Award. Within cancer genomics, the Rozen Lab studies alternative splicing, lncRNAs, and the use of mutational signatures as tools for studying cancer. Rozen also created and maintains the widely-used Primer3 software for PCR primer design. Previously, he studied rearrangement mutations in human Y chromosomes and their clinical consequences.