HIV PREVENTION AMONG CHINESE MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN: AN EXAMPLE OF CONDUCTING INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES TO ADDRESS PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES | Duke Kunshan University
HIV PREVENTION AMONG CHINESE MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN: AN EXAMPLE OF CONDUCTING INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES TO ADDRESS PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES
Speaker: 
Dr. Haochu Li

researcher of UNC Project-China, Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Sep 06th 2017 12:00 to 13:00
Room 1079, Academic Building

Summary of Talk:
 

Although global HIV response leading by the World Health Organization (WHO) has reached significant achievements, some key populations, including men who have sex with men (MSM), are still disproportionately affected by the epidemic. In order to end the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030, WHO has highlighted a people-centered approach that is capitalizing on community engagement. This approach treats people with dignity and respect by being aware of and supporting personal perspectives, values, beliefs and preferences.

The current presentation will draw on both ethnographic and structural equation modeling analyses among Chinese MSM. Guided by a social ecological framework, the ethnographic study is able to provide a holistic understanding and insider’s perspectives of HIV related issues among Chinese MSM, including their living circumstances, psychological and mental health status, health service seeking, and sexual behaviors. Hypotheses are then derived from these qualitative analyses. Structural equation modeling is used to testify mediation (direct/indirect) relationships among community engagement, peer norm, self-efficacy, and condom use based on the data from a condom promotion randomized controlled trial. This presentation will highlight the importance of conducting interdisciplinary studies to address public health issues, particularly in HIV prevention.

 

Brief Biography:

Haochu Li, BA, ML, MA, PhD, is an early career researcher of UNC Project-China, Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been committed to studying a global health issue of HIV prevention, intervention and care since 2004.

As an interdisciplinary health researcher, his research bridges social science and public health, adopting both qualitative and quantitative methods, in particular ethnography and structural equation modeling. He has study and research experiences in multiple countries/regions, including years of research experiences in NIH projects in the United States. He is a selected protégé in the American Psychological Association’s Cyber Mentors Program and serves as a reviewer for multiple international peer-reviewed journals.