How do early-life education and later-life self-management training help health? ----Evidence from Community-based diabetes management in China | Duke Kunshan University
How do early-life education and later-life self-management training help health? ----Evidence from Community-based diabetes management in China
Speaker: 
Dr. Judy Xu

associate professor, health economics and public policy in the School of Public Administration at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE)

Oct 17th 2016 12:00 to 13:00
Room 1079, Academic Building

Summary of Talk:

Large literature has documented the positive relationships between years of school and health. Although self-management training is highly recommended for glycemic control, the results are mixed. Up to now, few study investigates whether patients’ early life education influences self-management trainings on diabetes management.

With longitudinal data from the Community Diabetes Management Study (CDMS), this study employed random effect and pooled OLS to analyze the impact and mechanism of education and self-management training on glycemic control. Our results show that the impact of self-management training for glycemic control is significantly positive while the impact of education level is weak. Patients with lower level of education benefit more from the training through health knowledge and behavior changes. These impacts also vary with the locations of community health centers. 

The study suggests that diabetes self-management education is important for glycemic control. Although early-life education doesn’t reduce blood glucose directly, it may influence patients’ ability and willingness to change lifestyle indirectly. It calls for further research to investigate the complex relationships among early and later life education and health.

 

Brief Biography:

Dr. Judy Xu is an associate professor of health economics and public policy in the School of Public Administration at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE). She is also a Senior Research Fellow at Peking University China Center for Health Economic Research (CCHER). Professor Xu holds a Ph.D. in Health Economics from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her publications have appeared in peer-review journals including Health Economics, Health Policy, American Journal of Public Health, and BMC Health Services Research. Her current research interest area is applied health economics, health governance and chronic diseases management.