NIH Biomedical Funding: Evidence of Executive Dominance in Swing-Voter States during Presidential Elections | Duke Kunshan University
NIH Biomedical Funding: Evidence of Executive Dominance in Swing-Voter States during Presidential Elections
alberto-batinti
Speaker: 
Alberto Batinti

Assistant Professor, School of Public Economics and Administration of the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

Sep 14th 2016 12:00 to 13:00
Room 1079, Academic Building

Summary of Talk:

This paper explores the role of presidential politics in influencing the distribution of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. In particular, it investigates how the distribution of NIH funding is stirred towards institutions located in swing-voter US states during presidential elections. In doing so, it fills a gap left in the literature on the political economy of the NIH, which previously focused on the role of membership in the Committees on Appropriations in both chambers of the US Congress. First. it is found that NIH funded performers in states where the Presidential Electoral Importance (PEI) increases by 1%, receive, on average 0.7% to 0.8% more funding. Second, this effect is robust to three additional robustness checks. Third, I run heterogeneity tests, where the direction and change of the elasticity coefficient fit plausible assumptions on the mechanism of presidential influence on swing-voter states. I finally estimate, that the lower bound of overall impact on the NIH budget is between 2 and 3%.

 

Brief Biography:

Alberto Batinti holds the Position of Assistant Professor at the School of Public Economics and Administration of the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. His research interests involve political economy, public choice, healthcare policy, and health technological innovation. On these topics he published research papers in academic journals as Public Choice, Health Economics, and The Journal of Public Finance and Public Choice.