Oh Tobacco! Children, ethnography, and public health | Duke Kunshan University
Oh Tobacco! Children, ethnography, and public health
Speaker: 
Allan Burns, Ph.D.

Allan Burns, Ph.D., is Visiting Professor at DKU and Jessie B. DuPont/Magid Professor Emeritus of Indigenous Languages and Literatures of the University of Florida.

Feb 05th 2015 12:00 to 13:30
Room 1103

About The Lecture

Researchers and policy makers have spent time, energy, and funds to reduce smoking prevalence in China, the United States, and many countries around the world.  Special attention has been given to reducing smoking among young people, but very little research has been done on how and why children (ages 9-15) start smoking.   With funding from the famous "tobacco settlement" in Florida, anthropologists from the University of Miami and I carried out ethnographic studies on smoking initiation among youth in urban and rural areas of the state.  A bio-cultural approach, which includes understanding the biological response to ingesting tobacco and the speed of dependency among biologically young people with the social context of smoking among children provides surprising insights into "the first smoke" and implications for reducing tobacco dependence.

About The Speaker

Allan Burns, Ph.D., is Visiting Professor at DKU and Jessie B. DuPont/Magid Professor Emeritus of Indigenous Languages and Literatures of the University of Florida. He has carried out research in medical anthropology, migration studies, linguistics, and applied anthropology in many places around the world, including the U.S., Europe, Mexico, Central America and in Micronesia. He has held positions of professor, Department Chair, Senior Associate Dean, Fulbright and Honors mentor, and Director of study abroad programs in Mexico. He served as the President of the international Society for Applied Anthropology and was awarded the "Sol Tax" career award by the Society in 2013. He has been honored with four "teacher of the year" awards and the University of Florida "outstanding Ph.D. mentor award." Within the state of Florida he received three awards for Ph.D. mentoring of minority graduate students by the Florida Education Endowment. His interests in global health have included research on tobacco use among young people, glaucoma and quality of life studies among different ethnic groups, sociolinguistic implications of stroke and aphasia, indigenous medicine, and migration and health. Burns has published three books, over a hundred articles and chapters, and has produced several documentaries that have been shown on public television stations in the U.S. He has also produced intervention videos used by indigenous Mayan mothers and midwives, and others explaining Mayan pregnancy and birth beliefs to hospitals and clinics. Burns has served on the Pan American Health Organization technical committee on indigenous responses to TB and other infectious diseases.