Faculty and Course Profiles

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Spring 2016 Courses

Humanities & Arts

  • Writing Across Cultures (Writing 230SK) | Session 2

Patrick Morgan
Instructor, English Department and Thompson Writing Program, Duke University
Editorial Assistant, American Literature, Duke University Press

Patrick Morgan earned his M.A. in English at Duke University. He is currently a scholar in the Duke English Department and the editorial assistant for American Literature, Duke University Press. Focusing on the intersection of science and literature in American culture, his scholarly writing has appeared in The Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies. As a science journalist, his writing has appeared in Discover magazine, Earth magazine, and The American Gardener.

“Writing Across Cultures” is an advanced course that will give students experience and training in English-language writing through theme-based seminars on a topic selected by the instructor, such as body and illness, local communities, art and dance, folktales and children’s literature, history of science, photography, etc. Course components include cross-cultural inquiry within writing, as well as an emphasis on making texts public. | View Syllabus

  • Interethnic Intimacies (AMES 415K) | Session 2

Nayoung Aimee Kwon
Associate Professor, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University

Nayoung Aimee Kwon received her Ph.D. from UCLA in 2007. She is an Assistant Professor of Korean and Japanese Cultural Studies in the Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies. She is currently working on her book manuscript Translating Empire: the Conundrum of Collaboration on Korea and Japan (forthcoming from Duke University Press) which exams the broader problem of colonial modern and postcolonial contestations in East Asia.

This course will examine the cultural politics and the political economies of “interethnic intimacy” or “intercourse,” broadly defined, as represented in literature and visual culture from and about Asia.  Texts from literature, visual culture, and history will be read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, postcolonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the self/other, contextualized in “Asian Empires” from the past to the present. Format is lecture, small group discussions, and film analysis. | View Syllabus

  • Kunqu, the Classical Opera of Globalized China | Session 2

Joseph Lam
Professor of Musicology, University of Michigan

Dr. Lam is a historian specializing in Chinese, Asian, and Asian American music. He has published and lectured widely in America, Asia, and Europe. Two of his recent publications are “State Sacrifices and Music in Ming China: Orthodoxy, Creativity, and Expressiveness”, and “Embracing Asian American Music as an Heuristic Device”, Journal of Asian American Studies. Professor Lam is the editor of the “ACMR Reports: Journal of the Association for Chinese Music Research”, and president of the Conference on Chinese Oral and Performing Literature.

This course examines kunqu, a historical genre of Chinese opera which first blossomed in mid 16th century Ming China and was popularly practiced until the late 1800s of Qing China (CZ). The genre barely survived in the first half of the 20th century. In 2001, UNESCO declared kunqu a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, and since then the genre has been vigorously revived and developed. It is now one of the most popularly performed and critically discussed genres of Chinese performing arts (CCI). By examining kunqu as the classical opera of globalized China through its representative works of literary lyrics, flowing melodies, and elegant acts and dances, and by analyzing the phenomenon with current theories of selves, cultural---social pragmatics, and opera as cultural---social---political performance, this course creates a passage for students to personally enter the expressive world of Chinese people, and experience their theatrical performances up close (ALP).

Social Sciences

  • Shanghai: From Treaty Port to Global Metropolis | Session 1

Andrew Field
Professor and Associate Dean of DKU Undergraduate Programs, Duke Kunshan University

Andrew Field holds a BA in Asian Studies from Dartmouth College (1991) and a PhD in East Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University (2001). He has taught courses in Chinese, East Asian, and World History for the University of Puget Sound, the University of New South Wales, Dartmouth College, New York University, Yonsei University, and Boston University. Prior to taking on the role of Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs for DKU, he also served various roles directing and managing academic programs in China for Dartmouth College, CIEE, Boston University, and the Hult International Business School. Andrew is the author of three books: “Shanghai’s Dancing World: Cabaret Culture and Urban Politics, 1919-1954” (2010), “Mu Shiying: China’s Lost Modernist” (2014), and co-author of “Shanghai Nightscapes: The Nocturnal Biography of a Global Metropolis” (2015).

Since the late 19th century, Shanghai has emerged as the leading metropolis in China in many respects. It has served as the breeding grounds and model for the social, political, economic and cultural modernization and urbanization of China over the century that followed.  Through a combination of lectures, readings, film screenings, field trips, and research projects, this course explores the history of Shanghai and connects the colorful legacy of the treaty port era (1842-1943) with the re-emergence of Shanghai as a global metropolis since the 1990s. While focusing mainly on those two eras, which have been the subjects of the bulk of scholarship in the emerging field of “Shanghai Studies”, we also examine the relatively neglected history of Shanghai prior to the 1840s, as well as the Mao Years of 1949-1976 when Shanghai became a bastion for the violent politics of the Cultural Revolution. | View Syllabus​

  • Genetics, Genomics, and Society (BIOLOGY 156K) | Session 2

Alison Hill
Assistant Professor of the Practice, Department of Biology, Duke University

Dr. Hill received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is currently an Assistant Professor of the Practice at Duke Biology. Her research interests include molecular mechanisms, DNA technology and the integration of physical and quantitative principles to molecular biology.

Introduction to the foundation of genomic sciences with an emphasis on recent advances and their social, ethical, and policy implications. Foundational topics including DNA, proteins, genome organization, gene expression, and genetic variation will be interwoven with contemporary issues emanating from the genome revolution such as pharmacogenetics, genetic discrimination, genomics of race, genetics of aging, genetically modified crops, and genomic testing. Genomic sciences and policy science applied to present and future societal, and particularly ethical, concerns related to genomics. | View Syllabus​

Physical & Natural Sciences

  • Human Domination of the Earth | Session 1

James F. Reynolds
Professor of Environmental Sciences and Biology, Duke University

Dr. Reynolds received his Ph.D. from New Mexico State University. He has extensive international experience in global change research and outreach. He is a Distinguished Professor of Environmental Sciences at Lanzhou University and a Humboldt Awardee at the University of Bayreuth in Germany. James has served on many international committees concerned with global change, such as the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (Steering Committee for Global Change in Terrestrial Ecosystems); the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (currently co-editing The Global Atlas of Desertification); the United Nations Environment Programme (Lead Author for 2014 Challenges of the Earth System); the European Commission (advisor on several international projects on global change in drylands); and is director of ARIDnet, an international network that to date has brought together scientists, citizens, and policy-makers in over 13 countries to explore underlying causes of, and potential solutions to, land degradation. His current research is to quantify global trends of urbanization and their potential socioeconomic and environmental consequences given projections of future climate change and water shortages.

Human domination of the Earth encompasses a wide range of topics, including climate change, land use change (deforestation, loss of biodiversity, agriculture, etc.), population growth, pollution of land/water/air, etc. Humans developed agriculture, cities and contemporary civilizations during the Holocene (the geologic epoch of the past 12,000 years) when the world’s population was very small, widely-dispersed and technologically-limited. Overnight (at least in geologic terms) the human population has exploded to 7+ billion and human-induced changes are evident everywhere: over 40-50% of the planet's land surface has been transformed by agriculture, urbanization and commercialization; billions of tons of coal and oil are burned everyday, emitting pollutants and greenhouse gases to the atmosphere; most major cities of the world are shrouded by toxic pollution; recent estimates suggest as many as one half of all species on Earth will be extinct in less than 100 years due to habitat destruction, pollution, invasive species, and climate change; and it is estimated that by 2025, over two-thirds of the world's population may face water shortages. It’s evident the Earth has entered a new geologic epoch – the Anthropocene – one that is uniquely characterized by the overwhelming impact of human activities on both the biophysical and biological spheres of the Earth. The question is: can our planet continue to provide an accommodating environment for humanity? | View Syllabus​

  • Systems Thinking and Resource Management Modeling | Session 1

James F. Reynolds
Professor of Environmental Sciences and Biology, Duke University

Dr. Reynolds received his Ph.D. from New Mexico State University in quantitative ecology and did postdoctoral research in biomathematics at the Agriculture Research Council in England. He has taught courses in biostatistics, systems ecology, biomathematics, mathematical modeling, biophysical ecology, resilience theory and systems thinking. James’ modeling has deal with a diversity of topics: e.g., how climate change may affect ecosystems of the Tibetan Plateau of China; the potential effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide on the water and carbon balance of the warm deserts of North America; how ground-level ozone impacts agricultural production; how to design the optimal placement of service roads to minimize their impact on the functioning of arctic systems of the North Slope of Alaska; and how rising temperature will accelerate methane emissions from tundra ecosystems of Siberia. His current research focuses on integrated assessment modeling (with case studies in Kenya and China) to summarize information from diverse fields of study (e.g., economics, social, environment), which are increasingly being used as tools to help decision-makers understand and manage very complex environmental problems.

Given the challenge of understanding linked human-ecological-economic systems, and the plethora of complex problems in a changing world, mathematical and computer simulation models are essential tools in resource management. Models are used extensively in basic research, management and policy-making. This course utilizes a “systems thinking” perspective to model-building, which is a departure from the traditional way of decision-making whereby complex systems were studied by dividing them into parts and then each part was analyzed separately. Systems thinking emphasizes a holistic approach that involves identifying essential components of systems that work together; elucidating the pathways of causality between these components (e.g., topology, hierarchy, feedbacks); and valuing the roles of self-organization, nonlinearity and thresholds as determinants of whole system behavior. This course is for students (1) with little or no modeling experience but are curious to learn more, especially with an emphasis on management examples; (2) students who recognize that simulation modeling is an important tool of choice in the modern world for problem-solving and thus want to be able to “look under the hood” of models; (3) students that have struggled with journal articles that contain models and equations; (4) students who have wondered if modeling might be useful in their own work; (5) students keen to be see how systems thinking is transforming education, is the basis for new biological conservation efforts, is used to train nurses, and constitutes the core curriculum in industrial dynamics, business, and resource management; and/or (6) want to learn how to build a model from scratch. | View Syllabus​

  • Frontiers of 21st Century Physics (PHYSICS 131K) | Session 2

David J. Brady
Fitzpatrick Family Professor of Photonics, Duke University

Dr. Brady received his Ph. D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1990. He was on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 1990-2001, when he joined Duke as the founding director of the Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics. He currently leads the Duke Imaging and Spectroscopy Program. His research focuses on computational imaging and compressive sampling with application to gigapixel photography, snapshot x-ray tomography and virtual reality.

Haiyan Gao
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Duke Kunshan University
Henry Newsome Professor of Physics, Duke University

Dr. Gao received her Ph.D. form California Institute of Technology in 1994. She is professor and Chairman of Physics Department at Duke University. Her research focuses on understanding the structure of nucleon in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), search for QCD exotics, and fundamental symmetry studies at low energy to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model of electroweak interactions.

Stephen Teitsworth
Associate Professor of Physics, Duke University

Dr. Teitsworth received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. His research centers on experimental, computational, and theoretical studies of deterministic and stochastic nonlinear electronic transport in nanoscale systems. Three particular areas of current interest are: 1) stochastic nonlinear electronic transport phenomena in semiconductor superlattices and tunnel diode arrays; 2) complex bifurcations associated with the deterministic dynamics of electronic transport in negative differential resistance systems; and 3) strategies for stabilizing negative differential resistance systems against the formation of space-charge waves.

The course “Frontiers of 21st Century Physics” is an introduction to several big questions in modern physics, such as what are the ultimate laws of nature, how does complex structure arise, and how can physics benefit society. Classes will involve presentations by researchers and by students, discussions of journal articles, and tours of physics labs involved with related research. Prequisites: Precalculus and at least one quantitative science course at the high school level, such as chemistry or physics. | View Syllabus​

Global Health

  • Maternal & Child Health (GLHLTH 571K) | Session 1

Alba Amaya-Burns
Associate Professor of the practice of Global Health, Duke University
Associate Professor of Global Health, Duke Kunshan University

Dr. Alba Burns received her Masters in Clinical Tropical Medicine (MSc CTM) at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London University and her Doctor of Medicine, MD at the University de El Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador. Her recent research focuses on multidisciplinary interventions to reduce the burden of infectious diseases in the poorest populations in Central America.

This course provides a solid foundation in global perspectives on maternal and child health research, practice, and policy. The course utilizes case analysis to examine critical health challenges facing women, children, providers, and policymakers in some of the world's most vulnerable communities. Topics covered will include data and measurement, health system challenges, public health interventions and programs, and policy and advocacy. The course is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Format is lectures, debates, group discussions, and reactions to weekly videos. |  View Syllabus

  • Medical Anthropology (CULANTH 424K) | Session 1

Allan Burns
Visiting Professor of Anthropology at Duke Kunshan University

Dr. Burns received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. His teaching and research interests cover anthropological linguistics, applied and medical anthropology, ethnicity and minority studies, refugees, international development, higher education in Latin America, and Maya studies.

This course is an examination of cross-cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body, and non-biological aspects of medicine. Topics covered include: 1) culture-specific sickness (such as envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder); 2) class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health, and 3) various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans. Class format includes lectures, group problem-solving, class discussions, and field trips. | View Syllabus

  • Non-communicable Diseases (GLHLTH 641K) | Session 1

 Lijing L. Yan
Associate Research Professor of Global Health, Duke Kunshan University

Yan's main areas of research are chronic disease prevention and control (cardiovascular disease and diabetes in particular), economic evaluations in health care, and integrated health management. She is the Principal Investigator or Co- Investigator on a number of NHLBI-funded and China-funded research grants. She has published dozens of peer-reviewed scientific papers some of which in leading medical journals such as JAMA (3 first-authored papers and 2 co-authored papers), Circulation, and Archives of Internal Medicine.

This course provides an overview of the recent (mid-20th century to the present) trends in non-communicable disease epidemiology and strategies for prevention and control of these diseases. The course focuses on four major disease categories as separate modules: cardiovascular, diabetic, oncologic, and pulmonary diseases. Assigned readings and classroom discussion provide students with a firm understanding of the shifting disease burden, stakeholders, and interventions to address non-communicable disease in low- and middle-income countries. Case studies are used to highlight selected geographic differences. The course is designed for the Master of Science in Global Health but is also open to advanced undergraduate students. |  View Syllabus / Overview

Business & Economics

  • Intermediate Mathematical Finance (MATH 381K) | Session 2

Jianguo Liu
Professor of Mathematics and Physics, Duke University

Jian-Guo Liu earned the BS and MS at Fudan University, China, in 1982 and 1985 respectively, and the PhD at University of California, Los Angeles, in 1990. He joined the Department of Mathematics at Temple University as an Assistant Professor in 1993 and moved to University of Maryland, College Park, where he became an Associate Professor in 1997, and a professor in 2001, in the Department of Mathematics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology. He joined Duke University in 2009 as professor of Physics and Mathematics. Dr Liu’s research is in the areas of collective dynamics, decision making and self-organization in complex systems from biology and social sciences; scaling behavior in models of clustering and coarsening; numerical methods for incompressible viscous flow; and Multi-scale Analysis and Computation.

Elementary concepts and tools of mathematical finance for students with solid mathematics background. The focus is quantitative methods that help students understand pricing of derivative securities, portfolio management and related questions.  Topics: Review of Probability. Random variables. Concepts of Brownian motion. Present value analysis. Notions of arbitrage and arbitrage theorem. Black-Scholes formula. Applications on Options. | View Syllabus​
Prerequisites: Calculus and basic quantitative skills. Can accommodate up to 25 students.

  • China International Management (MMS 375K) | Session 2

 Frank Long
Professor of Management at Duke Kunshan University
Director and Distinguished Professor, Strategic Decision Research Institute, Wuhan University.

Professor Long received his Ph.D. in Economic Sociology and Strategic Management from Syracuse University. He has taught a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses in China and the U.S. in international business, international marketing, international management, entrepreneurship, industrial sociology, and social science research methodology. His research interests include efficiency in China’s state-owned enterprises, price theory, and China’s economic transition and reform.

In this course students will trace and discuss the rapid development of China’s economy over the past 30 years. Economic trends will be linked to other aspects of life in China and also to the relations between China and other countries. Consideration will be given to regional as well as national economic development. The readings will include scholarly articles, popular analyses, and case studies. The format will be lectures and group discussions. | View Syllabus

Chinese Language

  • Mandarin (CHINESE 101DK,102DK, 203DK, 305DK) | Full Semester

Li Xu
Lecturer in Chinese Language, Duke Kunshan University

Xu Li earned her B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature and M.A. in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language from Beijing Normal University. From 2007 to 2011, Li served as a Chinese lecturer at Princeton University. She was the Beijing Language Director before moving to her position as Shanghai Language Director at the Alliance of Global Education in Fall 2011. Xu Li has experience in clearly defining and maintaining superior language instruction and working closely with the students

DKU offers a full range of Mandarin courses, from entry level to advanced 4th year writing. Oral and written placement exams are administered to determine the proper assignment of students to courses.

English Language

  • US Academic Writing for EFL Students (Writing 90SK) | Full Semester

Don Snow
Professor and Director of the writing and Communications Center, Duke Kunshan University

Dr. Snow earned his M.A. in English/TESOL at the Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University.  He taught English at Nanjing University and was the Director if English Language Center at Shantou University before his DKU appointment. Dr. Snow’s primary research interests focus on independent language learning , intercultural communication, language teaching diglossia and the historical development of written Chinese vernaculars.

Edie Allen
Lecturer of Writing and Language Programs, Duke Kunshan University & the DKU Program Office, Duke University

Edie Allen earned her B.A. in International Studies and her M.A. in Linguistics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has taught English at Duke University for the last 16 years and served as the Assistant Director of the Graduate School’s English for International Students program before her DKU appointment. Edie’s primary research and teaching interests focus on second language vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation development, and the literacy practices of graduate school.

Maxi-Ann Campbell
EFL/Academic Writing Instructor, Writing and Language Programs, Duke Kunshan University

Maxi-Ann Campbell received her M. A. in Applied Linguistics from Georgia State University. Prior to joining DKU as an EFL / Writing Instructor, she has taught English at Tsinghua University and Shantou University, and has served as a Global Academic Fellow at NYU Shanghai. Her research focuses on native-nonnative speaker interaction in university settings and the interplay of culture and language in Chinese English-medium universities on students’ development of linguistic and cultural competence.

The goals of the course are for students to gain practice, proficiency, and fluency in utilizing and analyzing formal U.S. academic features across a variety of academic genres. The course will also offer experience in oral presentations characteristic of U.S. academic environments.

Fall 2015 Courses

Humanities

  • Writing Across Cultures (Writing 230SK) |  Session 2

Sarah Elaine Neill
Instructor, Thompson Writing Program, Duke University

Dr. Sarah Elaine Neill received her Ph.D. in Musicology from Duke University. She is currently an instructor with Thompson Writing Program at Duke University. Her specialties are musicology and strings.

“Writing Across Cultures” is an advanced course that will give students experience and training in English-language writing through theme-based seminars on a topic selected by the instructor, such as body and illness, local communities, art and dance, folktales and children’s literature, history of science, photography, etc. Course components include cross-cultural inquiry within writing, as well as an emphasis on making texts public. | View Syllabus

  • Science Fiction (LIT 341) | Session 1 

Katherine Hayles
Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Literature, Duke University

Dr. Hayles received her Ph.D in English Literature from University of Rochester in 1977. She is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Literature at Duke University, and Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently teaching and writing on the relations of literature, science and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries. Her print book, How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis, was published by the University of Chicago Press in spring 2012. Her other books include How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics, which won the Rene Wellek Prize for the Best Book in Literary Theory for 1998-99, and Writing Machines, which won the Suzanne Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship.

Computational entities as depicted in science fiction novels and films.  How the shape of present and future worlds has been profoundly transformed, destabilizing notions of the human and the human life-world.  The texts question “human nature” by imagining computational futures in which humans can upload their consciousness into computers, human memory is completely entwined with computer memory, simulacra of entire worlds are created in computers, and the natural environment is all but obscured by virtual reality overlays.  How does ethnicity manifest when the entities depicted no longer have organic bodies?  How do cultural factions form when the environment is more virtual than real?  What would it mean for a computational entity to have an “authentic” selfhood?  | View Syllabus

Social Sciences

  • US/China Relations (HISTORY 221K) | Session 1 

Elise A. DeVido
Independent Scholar

Dr. DeVido received her Ph.D. in History and East Asian Languages from Harvard University. She served as Executive Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture at Cornell Law School. Dr. DeVido has rich experience teaching and advising both undergraduate and graduate students in Asian Studies. She has taught courses in Asian history, world history and gender studies. 

This course addresses the complex relationship between China and the United States from the eighteenth-century to the present, including the two countries' foreign relations, trade, cultural exchanges, and images and (mis)representations of each other. Starting with the arrival of Europeans and Americans in China, and moving to the Opium Wars and the Unequal Treaties to WWII, and Hollywood depictions of China, the course turns to China since 1949 and its relationship to the United States, covering themes of the Cold War to Nixon and China and the re-engagement of the two countries, including the challenges confronting China and its rise as an industrial superpower, and the environmental challenges thereof. | View Syllabus

  • Globalization and Cultural Trends in China (AMES 334K) | Session 2

Kang Liu
Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies at Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and Director of Program of Research on China, Duke University 

Dr. Liu received his Phd from University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is currently Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies at Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Director of Program of Research on China, Duke University. His current projects include global public opinion surveys of China’s image, Chinese soft power and public diplomacy, and political and ideological changes in China. He is the author of twelve books, including Aesthetics and Marxism(Duke University Press, 2000), Globalization and Cultural Trend in China(University of Hawaii Press, 2003), Culture/Media/Globalization (Nanjing University Press, 2006), Images of China as A Major Power (Shanghai People’s Press, 2014). In addition, Dr. Liu published widely in both English and Chinese on issues ranging from contemporary Chinese media and culture, globalization, to Marxism and aesthetics.

This course will explore contemporary cultural trends in China within the context of globalization from comparative, interdisciplinary, and interpretive perspectives, integrating social and political research, cultural, media theory and criticism, and historical studies. It is intended to enable students to examine China’s rapid rise over the last thirty-five years from primarily social science and humanities approaches, concentrating on issues of changing values, ideological contention, intellectual debates, media and public opinions. In addition, students will participate in the Duke-Shanghai collaborative research projects led by the instructor, such as field research, interviews and survey research, with team members (faculty, graduate and undergraduate students) from other Duke and Shanghai institutions.  | View Syllabus

Global Health

  • Fundamentals of Global Health (GLHLTH 101K) | Session 1 

Rukmini Balu
Adjunct Associate Professor, DGHI and Chief of Staff to Chancellor for Health Affairs

Dr. Balu received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her MBA from the Harvard Business School. She is the Director of Strategy and Partnership Development at Duke Medicine Global and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Duke Global Health Institute. Her interests include healthcare strategy, healthcare reform and reimbursement, and the health and economic implications of noncommunicable diseases, especially in emerging economies.

“The Fundamentals of Global Health” focuses on global disease burden, health determinants and disparities, health policy and actors, and the challenges of global health interventions. The format is lecture, intensive small group discussion, case analyses, with some materials presented by teleconferencing.

  • Social Determinants of Health (GLHLTH 305K) | Session 1 

Sara LeGrand
Assistant Research Professor, Global Health Institute, Duke University 

Dr. LeGrand received her Ph.D. in Health Services Research from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She is currently an Assistant Research Professor at the Duke Global Health Institute and the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research. The focus of her work is on reducing global health disparities by addressing determinants of health such as individual behavior, social and structural factors, and health policy. Over the last 10 years, she has conducted health disparities research in the US, Cambodia, Malawi, Bolivia, Peru, and India. Dr. LeGrand is particularly interested in the design and evaluation of technology-based HIV prevention and care interventions for highly marginalized populations. 

Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on global patterns and also contemporary Chinese society. Topics include obesity, HIV, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health.  | View Syllabus

  • Global Health Ethics: Interdisciplinary (GLHLTH 210K/Ethics 350K) | Session 2

Jeff Moe
Professor of the Practice, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University

Jeffrey Moe joined the Duke faculty in 2002 as an Executive in Residence at the Fuqua School of Business.  In 2015 he was appointed Professor of the Practice in the Duke Global Health Institute. His research interests include ethical problems in health care, incentives for neglected disease research, life-saving commodities to reduce maternal and child mortality and the scaling and replication of global health care delivery innovation.  Professor Moe received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Organization Development and Institutional Studies.  In the course “Global Health Ethics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives”, students will be asked to understand and apply ethics concepts (e.g. “aggregate good”, “consequentialism”, “fundamental moral unit”) and a method (simplified version of Gert’s “systematic moral analysis”) to analyze and discuss ethical dimensions of public health problems/solutions using historical examples. 

  • Research Methods in Global Health (GLHLTH 371K) | Session 2

Abu Abdullah
Research Professor of Global Health, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University
Professor of Global Health, Duke Kunshan University

Abu Abdullah, PhD is Research Professor of Global Health at Duke Global Health Institute at Duke University and Professor of Global Health at Duke Kunshan University. Professor Abdullah's current teaching and research is focused in the prevention and control of chronic diseases in low and middle income countries through programs that address heart disease, stroke, hypertension, and diabetes and common risk factors for these conditions such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, overweight/obesity, and mental illnesses. He also conducts research on HIV/AIDS epidemiology and Global Health. Professor Abdullah has considerable experience (as Principal Investigator or Co-investigator) in several epidemiological, behavioral and health services research projects in Asia and has worked in different areas including chronic disease prevention, infectious disease, travel medicine and health services and policy research in developing countries. Professor Abdullah has written few book chapters and has about 90 peer-reviewed publications covering several emerging aspects of public health.  Professor Abdullah periodically provides consultancy services on health improvement, global health research, and public health policy initiatives to international organizations and governments agencies. 

Introduction to research methods through examination of a variety of techniques in behavioral and social sciences and relevant to multidisciplinary GH research. Problem-based approach to identifying GH questions of interest, ways to operationalize and test, including strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Focus on discussing current GH issues, exploring questions and solutions, reading and evaluating published research and interpreting results. Skills include identification of GH problems, awareness of contextual, behavioral, and ethical issues involved, conceptualization of research questions, and designing a research study. | View Syllabus

Physical & Natural Sciences

  • Complex Systems (ISIS 170; COMPSCI 107; VISST 172) | Session 1 

Nicholas Gessler
Research Associate, Information Studies & Information Science, Duke University

Dr. Gessler is a Research Associate in Information Studies and Information Science at Duke University. Before joining Duke in 2008, he was the co-founder of Human Complex Systems Program at UCLA. His specialties are multi-agent simulation, evolutionary computation and meteorite recovery.

Philosophy and epistemology of emergence, computation and evolution applied to describing, understanding and explaining complex multiagent processes in nature, society and culture. Critical exploration of computer simulations informed by practice in building and visualizing them in C++ for PCs. From minimal worlds, like the chaos game and cellular automata, we design richer representations of growth, assimilation, segregation and flocking, finally creating agents, ecologies, societies and cultures that evolve and serve as desktop labs for evaluating theories in the arts, humanities, natural and social sciences. Included is work with sensors, actuators and early computing devices. No programming experience required.  | View Syllabus

  • Climate Change and Society (EOS 366K) | Session 2

Wenhong Li
Assistant Professor of Climate

Dr. Li received her Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2003. Her research interests focus primarily on climate dynamics, land-atmosphere interaction, hydroclimatology, and climate modeling. Her current research is to understand how the hydrological cycle changes in the current and future climate and their impacts on the ecosystems, subtropical high variability and change, unforced global temperature variability, and climate and health issues.

Patrick Brown
Ph.D. student, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University

Patrick is a PhD student in the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences under the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He studies natural 'unforced' global temperature variability and the Earth's energy budget. He got his undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in the department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and he has a Master's degree from San Jose State University from the department of Meteorology and Climate Science. Patrick lives with his fiancé Heidi, and their cat, Dr. Montenegro Vatoosh.

Climate variation during the entire scope of Earth history. Coupling between climate evolution and biological evolution. Methods for reconstructing climate history. Relative roles of natural climate variability and external forces and anthropogenic influences. Introduction to climate system modeling. No prerequisites but scientific and mathematical literacy assumed.  | View Syllabus

  • General Physics (PHYSICS 141LDK) | Session 1 

Thomas Mehen
Associate Professor, Department of Physics, Duke University

Dr. Mehen received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1998. He works primarily on Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the application of effective field theory to problems in hadronic physics.  Dr. Mehen has also worked on effective field theory for nonrelativistic particles whose short range interactions are characterized by a large scattering length. Some of Dr. Mehen's work is interdisciplinary. For example, techniques developed for nuclear physics have been used to calculate three-body corrections to the energy density of a Bose-Einstein condensate whose atoms have large scattering lengths. Dr. Mehen has also worked on novel field theories which arise from unusual limits of string theory. Examples include noncommutative field theories and theories of tachyonic modes on non-BPS branes.

Calculus-based, physics survey course for students planning study in medicine or the life sciences. Topics: kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, conservation laws, statics, gravitation, fluids, oscillations, mechanical waves, sound, thermal physics, laws of thermodynamics. This course is a combination of the lecture and the recitation (lab).  | View Syllabus

Business & Economics

  • Globalization, Development, and the Chinese Economy (HISTORY 225K) | Session 2

Elise A. DeVido
Independent Scholar

Dr. DeVido received her Ph.D. in History and East Asian Languages from Harvard University. She served as Executive Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture at Cornell Law School. Dr. DeVido has rich experience teaching and advising both undergraduate and graduate students in Asian Studies. She has taught courses in Asian history, world history and gender studies. 

A historical perspective on issues of development and globalization in China, including

  1. the study of circuits of consumption of everyday items
  2. the personal and environmental impacts of technology
  3. social dimensions of globalization and urbanization
  4. economic dimensions of globalization and urbanization | View Syllabus

Chinese Language

  • Mandarin (CHINESE 101DK,102DK, 203DK, 305DK) | Full Semester Course 

Li Xu
Lecturer in Chinese Language, Duke Kunshan University

Xu Li earned her B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature and M.A. in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language from Beijing Normal University. From 2007 to 2011, Li served as a Chinese lecturer at Princeton University. She was the Beijing Language Director before moving to her position as Shanghai Language Director at the Alliance of Global Education in Fall 2011. Xu Li has experience in clearly defining and maintaining superior language instruction and working closely with the students

DKU offers a full range of Mandarin courses, from entry level to advanced 4th year writing. Oral and written placement exams are administered to determine the proper assignment of students to courses.

English Language

  • US Academic Writing for EFL Students (Writing 90SK) | Full Semester Course 

Don Snow
Professor and Director of the writing and Communications Center, Duke Kunshan University

Dr. Snow earned his M.A. in English/TESOL at the Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University.  He taught English at Nanjing University and was the Director if English Language Center at Shantou University before his DKU appointment. Dr. Snow’s primary research interests focus on independent language learning , intercultural communication, language teaching diglossia and the historical development of written Chinese vernaculars.

Edie Allen
Lecturer of Writing and Language Programs, Duke Kunshan University & the DKU Program Office, Duke University

Edie Allen earned her B.A. in International Studies and her M.A. in Linguistics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has taught English at Duke University for the last 16 years and served as the Assistant Director of the Graduate School’s English for International Students program before her DKU appointment. Edie’s primary research and teaching interests focus on second language vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation development, and the literacy practices of graduate school.

Maxi-Ann Campbell
ESL/Academic Writing Instructor, Writing and Language Programs, Duke Kunshan University

Maxi-Ann Campbell received her M. A. in Applied Linguistics from Georgia State University. Prior to joining DKU as an EFL / Writing Instructor, she has taught English at Tsinghua University and Shantou University, and has served as a Global Academic Fellow at NYU Shanghai. Her research focuses on native-nonnative speaker interaction in university settings and the interplay of culture and language in Chinese English-medium universities on students’ development of linguistic and cultural competence.

The goals of the course are for students to gain practice, proficiency, and fluency in utilizing and analyzing formal U.S. academic features across a variety of academic genres. The course will also offer experience in oral presentations characteristic of U.S. academic environments.